Thursday, January 20, 2022

#TankaTuesday #Poetry Challenge No. 257 #Ekphrastic #PhotoPrompt @ColleenChesebro #Ekphrastic #poetry

Hello, beautiful readers! Colleen Chesebro's Tanka Tuesday challenge this week has us exploring Ekphrastic poetry. When I taught high school, I would use pictures to inspire the students to write all the time, but I never knew it was called this. Today's challenge was inspired by a painting by John William Waterhouse.

When I first saw this painting, it made me think of Valerie, a character from my Chronicle of the Diasodz series. Valerie's hair is brown and straight and the time period is wrong, but the way this woman peers into the crystal ball reminded me of the prophecy Valerie was given when she found out she was pregnant.

So, here is my attempt at writing a haibun. If this is your first visit with me, I should warn you that I am a novice at syllabic poetry. Each week, Colleen challenges us to try new forms. So, if I don't quite write a poem that follows the rules, consider it a learning experience for me. You cannot grow if you do not try. So, I hope you enjoy my response to this week's prompt:


Prophetic Sacrifice

She stared at the globe, where the most likely of many possible futures dissipated into the mist. A tear streamed down her cheek as she cradled her growing bump. The prophecy asked too much of her. She knew what she had to do, but she questioned whether she had the strength to do so.

beautiful unborn

must I make this sacrifice?

our fates intertwine


I hope you enjoyed that. I'd love to hear your thoughts below. If I've inspired you to join in the fun, click here to follow Colleen's challenges. :-)

27 comments:

  1. I'd say your first attempt was excellent, Yvette! :)

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  2. There's an entire book in those words. Very evocative. (K)

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    1. Thank you, Kerfe. It's actually an entire series. ;-) I'm happy you enjoyed it. :-)

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  3. A pregnant lady, I didn't see it! Lovely poem!

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    1. I'm happy to share a different perspective with you, Elizabeth. Thanks for stopping by. :-)

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  4. Beautiful, Yvette! Halibuns are one of my favorites to write of the symbolic poetry. A lot can be expressed in those few words and you did just that so well!

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    1. Thanks, Denise! I have read several of yours and loved them. They are what inspired me to give it a try with this painting. :-)

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  5. Lovely, Yvette, and perfect! You've brought reverence and tenderness to the painting. 💗

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    1. Aw, thanks, Gwen! I appreciate you sharing that with me. :-)

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  6. Wow, Yvette! That is so beautiful. No one else noticed the bump, but when you wrote it, I saw it. A fantastic response to the prompt! Kudos to you!

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    1. Thank you, Jan. Since I have an oracle in my series, the crystal ball made me think of her. Then, I saw Valerie's pregnancy dilemma when I saw the little bump in the dress. I'm happy you liked it. :-)

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  7. Ah... yes I thought she might be pregnant... But I once made an error when I thought someone was and they were not... so I never guess anymore!

    There are many stories that spring from the birth of expected or unexpected encounters... ;)

    (Jules from WP.Thanks for stopping by my shadorma)

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    1. Haha...yes, I never assume with a real human, but paintings seem safer for assumptions. ;-) Thanks for stopping by and making me laugh, Jules. (and you're welcome) :-)

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  8. I did enjoy that! What a great hook, Yvette, into a longer story. :-)

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  9. Yvette, this haibun is fabulous. I thought she was pregnant too! Your prose is spot on. The haiku portion is always the hardest. It should act as a comparison, different yet somehow connected. It shouldn't explain the prose. Remember haiku are nature related, and senryu are about human nature, like your senryu above. I created a haiku off of your senryu:

    an early sprout rests
    cradled within nature's womb
    dependent fates join

    I satisfied the nature portion of the haiku by drawing reference to the baby as an early sprout. "Dependent fates join" is the idea of symbiotic growth, how nature and the sprout (just like mother and baby) need each other to survive. In this way, you've connected the prose to the haiku.

    I hope you don't mind me writing this haiku. Your prose was so good. I picked up the same vibes from the painting. <3

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    1. I absolutely do NOT mind, Colleen! I appreciate you helping me learn and grow, and your example is fabulous! I love it!

      I knew my three lines weren't a true haiku because it didn't focus on nature. I now better understand that the haiku/senryu part shouldn't be a continuation of the prose but something separate and yet connected somehow. Can a haibun have a senryu, or is it always a haiku that follows?

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  10. There's intrigue. You may have to continue the story.
    I smiled at your intro, you show a healthy growth mind set.

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    1. Thank you, D. I actually pulled a character from my fantasy series for this poem. This moment in her life was the catalyst for the entire series. :-)

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  11. This Haibun is intriguing and beautiful. I enjoyed it much. :)

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    1. Thank you for sharing your enjoyment with me. I truly appreciate it. :-)

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  12. It's a beautiful haibun. Mysterious and intriguing.
    - Jude -

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  13. How lovely, Yvette. Perfect words that send the mind wandering. Love.

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I love comments, so please share your thoughts with me! :-)